Life After Heaven by Steven R. Musick Book Review

 

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Life After Heaven by Steven R. Musick

Mark Twain wrote, “The two most important days in your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why.”  Do you ever wish you knew what it’s like for people to die, go to heaven and be sent back by God?  This is a true story written by Steven R. Musick.  I was impressed by how he shows God is at work in the world.  What you will learn is the secret of bringing heaven to earth in your everyday world, and how to nurture a relationship with God so real and intimate that you’ll feel his nearness as strongly as Steve did.  I was given this book from blogging for books for an unbiased review.  @ 2017 Jackie Paulson

Book Review of The Kind of Torts by John Grisham

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Can a drug which was tested on human subjects make them commit random and senseless killings?  Do pharmaceutical companies want to pay settlements to cover it up?

This couldn’t be more perfect to read as I am in college and learning all about legal issues.  This is one of my favorite authors now that I have read this legal and suspenseful book.  I was surprised how much I already knew in the legal issues with regarding how pharmaceutical company’s make bad drugs with so many side effects that it is easier to make the drugs and settle out of court and still make a profit for drugs that should not be given to consumers. D1.jpg

The Character of Clay Carter is very realistic!  The book opens with Clay being a Public Defender with a law degree working in Washington D.C. in a police department.  Yes, his pay being very poor, who would rather practice law at a much higher pay rate.

Clay is given a case to defend Tequila Watson, a man accused of a random street killing.  But to his surprise, he is visited by a mysterious man named Max Pace.  He wants to arrange a series of large pay-offs to a bad drug nicknamed “Tarvan.”

Tequila Watson and others are recovering drug addicts and were experimented on illegally by an unnamed pharmaceutical company.  This was a total page turner!  Pace pays Clay a lot of money to set up his own law firm to handle the victims.  Clay got enough money to specialize in the litigation of torts and he hired his friends who he knew could handle such a task in a fast manner.

Of course the book has a romance with a twist.

As fast as Clay earns the top ten highest paid lawyer in the country he later becomes reckless and is subject to investigations for various crimes, including insider trading.  In the end Clay is beaten up by men from Reedsburgh, which send him to the hospital.  He loses a huge case against Goffman and previous clients sue him.  To that end, Clay loses his wealth, his dreams, and flies to London on the private jet, to start a new life, with his girlfriend only to sell his jet to keep afloat financially in his future.  I would recommend this book to anyone with a passion to learn about law.  Of course this is a fast read and total entertainment.  @ 2017  Jackie Paulson

Guest Post Book Review by Review Tales

 

Jeyran is a blogger, consumer reviewer, book editor, book promoter and a freelance book translator. Her website Review Tales demonstrates her thoughts, reflections and book reviews.

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Angles – Part I by Erin Lockwood

This review was kindly requested by the Author, Erin Lockwood

The story of Angels is a captivating tale about a girl names Caralee. She has a loyal group of friends and one best friend, Teddy who looks out for her all the times. He gets married at the beginning of the story to a lovely girl named Anne. Although the triangle at first looks like he has feelings for Cara and it is going to be a troublesome trio, the story takes on a new drama twist with the appearance of a dashingly handsome man named Sam.

Sam is everything a girl wants not just by the way he looks but also his mannerism. The sense of security, sensuality, and his gentlemanly behavior is to perfection. His presence alone brings along turmoil of emotions for Cara, let alone the way he interacts with her. There is a slight problem, though; Cara is already in a relationship with another gentleman, Jason.

The protectiveness of Teddy also takes a great deal of affect in this tale where Sam and Jason both are his friends, and he appears to have strong feelings for Cara himself, as well.

This dynamic tale of events does certainly wrap your head in a twist but, thankfully not so much of a knot. The pace and level of understanding are superb along side the skill in making each character appealing to the reader. The Author has excellent taste in expressing what actually goes on in a woman’s head. There was so much back and forth that even I, as a woman felt like saying “no wonder they say we, as women, are complex.”

I found Cara not as mature and robust as I would have liked her to be. When you have so many men wanting to be with you and constantly trying to steal your affections, then a substantial lead would be more attractive. The issue Cara had was that the men she was in a relationship would not commit to her and in her defense, she does come to a realization that she has to grow up, but it is a little too late. Altogether, her vulnerability was pleasing to the plot, and I enjoyed the inter-connectivity of the whole story together.

The ending is sweet and promises a second series. I look forward to finding out what happens to this girl and her friends.

I recommend this book to contemporary romance readers. You will enjoy reading this book in one sitting.

Written by Jeyran Main @ ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Share your thoughts on her review and click above to stop by her blog!  She has outstanding book reviews for all reader types.  I am a book addict but she is far more advanced than I can be in 2017 as I am in college full time.  Thanks jackie-paulson-signifture-for-blog-oists

 

Book Review Dear Amy by Helen Callaghan

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Do you want to learn about dissociative amnesia?  Do you know what it is?  I had no idea until I read this book.  Dear Amy by Helen Callaghan is a British writer.  Being born in the USA I had a hard time with some of the dialect and the words.  Kerb is spelled that way as I am use to curb.  Overall the book was well written.  It flowed good.  I had a hard time keeping up with all the characters!  I wanted to buy this book because it is based on crimes.  This book is really good with keeping out the gore of how a man kidnaps teenagers and keeps them in a cellar. Katie Brown is packing a backpack to run away from home. It’s raining in the month of October as she darts out the door and down the street when suddenly a man in a car offers her a ride.  A good quote: “There’s nothing you can do; the only way out is forward.”  Katie keeps walking and does get kidnapped.  An investigation is triggered, labelling the kidnapper a psychopath.  I chose not to disclose much of this book as it is a heart-wrenching story that reminds me of all the missing teenagers in our world today. @ 2016 Jackie Paulson

7 Christmas Books for Kids

7 Christmas Books for Kids

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The story: The Grinch, a grouchy, selfish creature who lives in a cave above the town of Whoville, grows annoyed at the Whos’ joyful Christmas celebrations and decides to stop Christmas from coming by disguising himself as Santa Claus and stealing all their presents and decorations on Christmas Eve.
Why you should read it: Dr. Seuss’ critique of the commercialization of Christmas is just as relevant now as it was when the book was published in 1957. The small-hearted Grinch’s transformation reminds readers young and old that Christmas is about much more than gifts.

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Tom Hanks and director Robert Zemeckis (“Forrest Gump”; “Cast Away”) reunite for “Polar Express,” an inspiring adventure based on the beloved children’s book by Chris Van Allsburg. When a doubting young boy takes an extraordinary train ride to the North Pole, he embarks on a journey of self-discovery that shows him that the wonder of life never fades for those who believe.

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Frosty the Snow Man:  Boys and girls ages 3 to 7 will feel the magic of the holiday season with this full-color storybook retelling the tale of the most famous snowman of all, Frosty the Snowman!

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The story: Old, bitter Ebenezer Scrooge hates Christmas and its celebrations until four ghosts appear to him one Christmas Eve and show him how miserable his life has become and how he must change if he wishes his life to be worth anything.
Why you should read it: This abridged version of Charles Dickens’ classic Christmas tale stays true to the original story in a way that younger readers can understand. As a bonus, the artwork by Brett Helquist (illustrator of the Series of Unfortunate Events books) is gorgeous and compelling.

 

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The story: While his family sleeps on Christmas Eve, a man is preparing to go to bed when he hears Santa Claus flying through the sky to his house. He goes downstairs to see what’s going on and runs into Father Christmas himself.
Why you should read it: No Christmas book list would be complete without this classic poem, and this edition’s beautiful illustrations make Clement C. Moore’s stanzas even more magical. Highly recommended for Christmas Eve bedtime reading.

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This book is fabulous. The letters are adorable, sure to win the hearts of young and old.  We loved the letters and decided that reading them together.  It was a new Christmas tradition for us. Even better are the illustrations. I ordered a second copy as I plan to frame some of them as the most charming Christmas decorations. I wish I could buy the originals of the illustrations. Truly, Tolkien was a genius. If you only know his “Lord of the Rings” or “Hobbit” booms, you’re in for a treat.

11111.pngThis “new classic” Christmas story brings together two great traditions: the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree and the neighbor-helping-neighbor program of Habitat for Humanity. Opening in Depression-era New York City, The Carpenter’s Gift tells the story of eight-year-old Henry and his father selling Christmas trees. They give a Christmas tree to construction workers building Rockefeller Center and celebrate together. Through the kindness of the construction workers and neighbors, Henry gets his wish for a nice, warm home to replace his family’s drafty shack. He plants a pine-cone from that first Rockefeller Center Tree. As an old man, Henry repays the gift by donating the enormous tree that has grown from that pine-cone to become a Rockefeller Center Christmas tree. After bringing joy to thousands as the Rockefeller Center tree, its wood will be used to build a home for another family in need.  Written by children’s nonfiction author David Rubel in collaboration with Habitat for Humanity. Gorgeous illustrations crafted by Jim LaMarche. The Horn Book said, “Rubel’s story of compassion hits all the right holiday notes; LaMarche’s lush, warm illustrations of glowing Christmas trees and smiling, caring characters’ drive home the central message of charity.”

# 22 A graphic novel

Once again, Ed Brubaker makes the list… he tops it, in fact. For my money Brubaker has helmed the absolute best contemporary crime comics available, from Gotham Central, to Fatale and of course, his masterful Criminal series drawn by Sean Phillips. Brubaker always crafts an expert detective yarn. Criminal, as a long standing series, has told a number of different stories throughout its life in print, but my favorite tale would have to be the most recently told: The Last of The Innocent. Classic crime noir has never been done better in a graphic novel. Everything just works so well; the doomed, morally bankrupt protagonist, the dialog, the set-up, the payoff. All of it is tight and smart. Criminal: The Last of the Innocent is tragic and beautiful in all of its garish, human ugliness, and it stands as the prime example of crime fiction done right in the graphic medium.
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#21 A book a family told you to read

Life of Pi by Yann Martel. My mother sent me a copy, thinking I might be interested….I loved parts one and three, but thought that part two dragged a little too long.

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Life of Pi is a Canadian fantasy adventure novel by Yann Martel published in 2001. The protagonist, Piscine Molitor “Pi” Patel, an Indian boy from Pondicherry, explores issues of spirituality and practicality from an early age. He survives 227 days after a shipwreck while stranded on a lifeboat in the Pacific Ocean with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

The novel, which has sold more than ten million copies worldwide,[1] was rejected by at least five London publishing houses[2] before being accepted by Knopf Canada, which published it in September 2001. The UK edition won the Man Booker Prize for Fiction the following year.[3][4][5] It was also chosen for CBC Radio‘s Canada Reads 2003, where it was championed by author Nancy Lee.[6]

The French translation, L’Histoire de Pi, was chosen in the French CBC version of the contest Le combat des livres, where it was championed by Louise Forestier.[7] The novel won the 2003 Boeke Prize, a South African novel award. In 2004, it won the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature in Best Adult Fiction for years 2001–2003.[8] In 2012 it was adapted into a theatrical feature film directed by Ang Lee with a screenplay by David Magee

# 20 A Science fiction novel

science-fiction-novelA Science fiction novel…Sankara Saranam’s Permanent Waves is an intricate cosmological adventure in which the origins and future of universal life are bound up in one personality, who is charged with the incomprehensible task of eternal preservation.

As a powerful priestess, Evenshar, gazes into the water, her lover plunges a knife into her back, initiating a bloody end to a matriarchal temple culture. Yet this event is more significant than its momentary and horrific violence. As her murderer discovers, Evenshar’s death is destined to reverberate across eons, connecting humanity’s beginnings to its possibly universally significant ends.

Indriya does not know why he is condemned to carry his memories from life to life, encountering incarnations of his murdered beloved across millennia. At first, that attachment is a burden; he is overwhelmed by guilt toward each version of the priestess, who recurs as his lover, his daughter, and his wife.

On a scale of thousands of years, matriarchal and patriarchal power oscillate, all within Indriya’s sight. But respite comes once he recognizes that there’s more at play in his reincarnation than just the tragic story of one couple. A yogi, his Fegg guide across centuries, helps Indriya unlock the truth underlying it all.

Humanity advances, and Evenshar’s incarnations lead to Petra, a gifted retooler who pushes humanity back toward Mars. There, the Dragon Event, an event horizon tied into the fabric of all, lies dormant. Awakened, it could result in a Dewah, a being as enlightened and powerful as a god. Or, Indriya worries, it could unmake everything.

Permanent Waves is a narrative etiology, a work that develops its own metaphysical vision and then nourishes it, through rich details, toward magnificent fruition. As the novel moves from ancient Egypt to Martian expeditions, the roots of humanity come into relief, as do the abilities of attuned individuals to affect them.

A complex and awe-inspiring picture emerges, in which infinitesimal moments carry universal magnitude. The novel marches human beings toward both enlightenment and their possible undoing, jumping across the universe and through time with alacrity and confidence.

The first sections are given to Indriya’s development on Earth and on Mars, and they set a firm and provocative foundation for the great leaps that follow. Later portions of the book are devoted to setting the stage for a cosmological showdown with beings from a universe beyond our own.

These final segments are dialogue-heavy and boundary-pushing, with visions so complex they must be mulled over rather than absorbed. Language is heavily theoretical, and leaps in the story occur quickly, but all challenges yield narrative and philosophical rewards.

Permanent Waves is a daring work of science fiction that takes notions of eternal recurrence in fantastical new directions while testing the boundaries of human imagination with continual surprises.

Diana Wing The True Nature of Tarot Book Reivew

 

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Your True Path to personal empowerment deals with card interpretations, and progressive insights to tarot as a tool of growth and enlightenment. Have you wanted to learn how to read Tarot cards?  Did you know that it is not at all evil and its misconceptions are null and void?  The book contains advanced techniques, card interpretations, and progressive insights into tarot as a tool to help yourself and others through the art of tarot reading. Diane has been reading the Tarot for over twenty-five years as well as being a Reiki master, teacher and life coach with a Master’s degree in psychology and many years in intuitive studies. Diane has spent many years fine tuning the art of Tarot and providing all she knows in this comprehensive 101 manuals for the newcomer and a more advance reader for the experienced, it suits all who read it. This book will allow you to experience your own intuitive abilities by helping you to grow or you can just use this as a casual reader answering any questions you may have about the subject. There is also a section in which she discusses the purported “evil” aspects of Tarot, bringing many interesting thoughts to the fore. I was equally thrilled to read about the individual tarot cards themselves. I have never seen anyone describe the cards such as Diane Wing has, they are more true to human nature than the stiff descriptions of other cards I have read. “The True Nature of Tarot” is for anyone interested in learning to read Tarot cards or educating yourself enough to understand Tarot cards when they are read for you.

The section on Interpreting the cards is extensive. All 78 cards are given equal explanation and accompanied with pictures to identify each card. I liked that the author describes every detail in each card. Every detail has a meaning or sentiment. Wing also offers multiple interpretations of each card along with “Key Words” for better understanding.

# 17 A book about a Political memoir

674181.jpgMadam Secretary: A Memoir

In this outspoken and much-praised memoir, the highest-ranking woman in American history shares her remarkable story and provides an insider’s view of world affairs during a period of unprecedented turbulence. A national bestseller on its first publication in 2003, Madam Secretary combines warm humor with profound insights and personal testament with fascinating additions to the historical record.